Month: October 2014

Three Phrases Not Welcome On The Touchline

FA Respect Line

 

As the Football Development Officer at Waltham FC, here are three remarks or phrases that I would like to ban from the sidelines of our junior football matches:

 

1) “Big kick”

To me, shouting “big kick” implies that you would like the child in possession of the ball to punt the ball forward as far and as hard as he can, with less importance on where the ball actually ends up. Some spectators can be heard praising a big powerful kick even when it goes out of play or to the opposition. In my eyes this is no way to help a young player. It is teaching them that if they aimlessly blast the ball as hard as they can up the pitch, it is a good thing that they will be praised for. If we’re interested in the long-term development of a player, people must not encourage the “big kick”. Instead, we would like the player to be creative, dribble, hold onto the ball, shield the ball or pass to a team-mate. I ask my kids what happens if they boot the ball off the pitch or up to the opposition goalie, and they rightly tell me that they are just giving the ball to the other team. They understand and try to do something with the ball instead. Of course, the player could choose to play a long pass to a team-mate further up the pitch, but there’s a notable difference between that and the “big kick” that some would encourage.

 

2) “Get rid of it”

This can be linked to the first one. Shouting for a young player to get rid of the ball will only instill a feeling of panic in that player. If this is shouted enough at young players, it’s also likely it’d have long-term effects as the player reaches a point where he thinks he needs to get rid of the ball straight away. Perhaps people might only shout “get rid of it” when it looks like the player is closed down by the opposition and there may be a danger of losing the ball. Well the solution here should be to let the child problem-solve. Let them work out how they can overcome the problem. Do they try and dribble past a player, pass, or keep the ball until it is possible to do one of those things? Let them think for themselves and make that decision. Kids are often more creative than adults and so you may be surprised with what they can do. Otherwise, when they’re older and are put under pressure by opposition players, all they’ll know how to do is panic and get rid of it, with no idea of how they can keep the ball.

 

3) “Pass to Joe”

Telling a kid who to pass to is like doing their maths homework for them that they bring home from school. Every time you instruct a child what to do in what is supposed to be a learning environment, you take away a learning opportunity for the child. You take away the child’s chance to practice decision-making. You take away their ability to reflect on their decision afterwards and think what they might do differently next time. The other thing to consider is that the person giving the instruction could also be giving poor advice or hindering the creativity. It could be poor advice because adults on the side don’t always know the right choice. It could hold a player back because they may hear a shout of “pass to Joe”, when really they are capable of dribbling past 3 players and lashing the ball in the top corner of the net. Finally, an obsession with wanting players to pass the ball could lead to problems at a later age when there is no passing option available, so it’s important, especially at the younger age groups, that the players learn and experiment how they can do something with the ball themselves.

 

Remember – Encourage, don’t instruct

Please remember the Club’s Respect Codes of Conduct that all parents and Coaches are expected to adhere to. Please avoid coaching your child or other children through the game, as it may contradict what the coach is doing, remove learning opportunities for the child or simply reduce the enjoyment of playing if everyone is shouting all the time. I’ve highlighted three phrases we don’t want to hear above, but remember it is just praise and encouragement we want to hear from behind that Respect Line at the side of the pitch. If your child makes it to a professional Football Club’s academy or even just a trial, you won’t be able to tell them what to do then, so allow them that practice now. For anyone that would still like to shout, instruct and control a player, you might find FIFA 15 on the PlayStation more suitable.

 

#LetThemPlay

Advertisements