Waltham Lions’ Journey from 5v5 to 11v11 Football

Waltham Lions are now coming to the end of our second and final season playing the 5v5 format of Mini-Soccer. During the 2 seasons of 5v5, I’ve generally told the outfield players to play as a defender (one), midfielder (two) or striker (one), but the only real position I’ve been concerned with asking someone to stick to is the defensive role – just to have someone deeper than the other three players. But over the coming summer we’ll be introducing more specific positions.

As we begin the transition to 7-a-side football, you’ll see my philosophy of developing good all-round players with good game intelligence continue, by allowing players to play in different positions. There’s no way of knowing what position an 8-year-old will end up playing when he’s 18. And I could give you plenty of examples of Premier League footballers that play in different positions as professionals to where they played in junior/youth teams. So they need to have an understanding of different roles in the team, not just for when they’ll play in different positions themselves, but also to understand how their team-mates in positions near to them on the pitch might play.

In terms of formations and how I’ll set the Lions up to play, it’ll be with a long-term plan in mind. In the years to come, I’ll give the players the chance to learn and experiment with different formations. But the plan will be geared towards a team playing 4-3-3 once we reach 11-a-side. And I’ll be putting the plans for this in place when we start playing 7v7.
 
Watch the YouTube video below that I’ve uploaded to explain how the Lions will transition from 7v7 to 9v9 and then to 11v11:
 

7v7

When we start playing 7v7 football for the 2015/2016 season as new Under 9’s, we’ll generally (but not always) use a 2-3-1 formation. The two wing-backs and central midfielder will all break forward to attack but will get back to support the defence when we lose the ball. 7v7 - 2-3-1 The two wing-backs and central midfielder will all break forward to attack but will get back to support the defence when we lose the ball.

9v9

After two seasons of playing 7v7, we will then progress to 9v9 when we are Under 11’s. This is the age group where the offside rule comes into play and we use bigger goals than those used in 5v5/7v7. At this point we will keep the basic structure of the team and just add two midfielders.

9v9 - 2-3-2-1

11v11

Then after two seasons of 9v9, we will start playing the full 11-a-side format of football at the Under 13’s age group. When this time comes, all we will need to do is add two attacking wingers to the existing set-up.
11v11 - 4-3-3
 
So each transition to a different format is kept quite simple by adding two players to what we are already doing, rather than switching the whole team set-up around. It’s all designed with the long-term plan in mind, ending up with a fluid and flexible 4-3-3 formation at 11v11. But, as I said earlier, I’m trying to develop intelligent and versatile players fit for the modern yet ever-changing game, so we will learn and practice other formations too.

4-3-3

There are a few reasons I’ve chosen this 4-3-3 and this method of going up through the different formats as the favoured, but not only, way of playing. Firstly, it fits in with my philosophies on coaching and playing the game. Secondly, when compared to the standard British formation of 4-4-2, the 4-3-3 allows much more flexibility and gives the player in possession of the ball more passing options. In the flat 4-4-2, you’ll typically have three straight lines of players. Flat 4-4-2 This can make it difficult to keep controlled possession of the ball and play through the thirds of the pitch, as you’re often just left with options for a backwards, sideways or forward pass (but rarely all three). In the 4-3-3 as shown below, you’ll have five lines of players to be able to play through as you work the ball through the thirds of the pitch. 4-3-3 Layers This helps you move up the pitch in possession. And you can see below how many different angles it creates between team-mates all over the pitch, as opposed to the square and limited right-angle options that the predictable 4-4-2 provides. 4-3-3 Angles These extra layers in this 4-3-3 also make it more difficult for opposition players to find space “between the lines” or “in the pockets of space” as is often spoken about.
 
No doubt when we get to 11v11 at Under 13’s, most teams we play against will play 4-4-2 – just because it’s the traditional way to play in England and it’s what most people grew up with. However the game has moved on. In the same way I want all of my players to be creative and use their imagination, I’ll try and make sure the team as a whole reflects that in the way we set up to play. So there you go, that will be my plan.
 
But as ever in Coaching, you have to be adaptable, and I will remain so. And just before closing, here’s a slideshow of some other formations we’ll go with at some point at 11-a-side:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Thanks for reading.
 
UTL.
 
Tommy Bryan (Coach)

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